Clean Well-Lit Rooms

I wonder what it would be like – for each 911 call – to arrive on scene and have that scene always be a clean exam room full of soft white light where your patient has been bathed and dressed in a hospital gown and lays or sits on an exam table, awaiting you. Before you walk into the room, there is a chart for you. You can read the patient’s complete medical history as well as review the vital signs an EMT has just taken for you. Then you walk into the room and introduce yourself and your patient smiles and looks at you with reverence and speaks clearly and understandably when you ask them questions, and answers those questions fully and truthfully.

“So how long have you been coughing up the green phlegm,” you ask. Or “Tell me how much cocaine you did before you developed this chest pain?” Or “Tell me about how you got stabbed here in the stomach?”

There would be no vomiting third floor carry-downs, no hoarders laying in their own feces. No barking dogs. No blaring TVs. No belligerent drunks with blood streaming down their faces from deep head gashes. No driving rainstorms or thorny bushes to make your way through. No maggots. No Urine. No smells that test your retch threshold.

Just Ivory-soad scented patients and straight forward medicine. All in a clean well-lit room.

I wonder what that would be like?

12 Comments

  • Well, we can dream…

    (You’re right, it would certainly make the actual medicine part easier!)

  • EMTyarn says:

    Well, I’m allergic to Ivory soap, but other than that yes it would be nice!

  • Daniel says:

    Be careful or you might lose a few future EMTs to the nursing profession. I am pursuing a bachelor’s degree in EMS, but I have to say that post really makes nursing sound heavenly.

  • phil lopian says:

    that would be like a podiatrist office. who wants that. i’m in it for the chaos. if i wanted neat clean orderly id have been an accountant

    Phil
    Paramedic/ ER RN

  • It must be nice to have only 1 patient at a time.

    It must be nice to only have to care for a patient for 30 minutes.

    It must be nice to know that the hospital can’t turn away a patient nearly as easy as a service can refuse an admission (since most EM physicians can’t admit).

    It must be nice to know that your paycheck isn’t directly related to whether the patient can pay.

    It must be nice that, if in those 30 minutes, you can immediately ring a physician for a consult instead of playing phone tag with the on-call specialist.

  • tim says:

    It’d be boring, right? 🙂

  • medicscribe says:

    Thanks for the comments,

    Joe, you are right. For all the drawbacks of prehospital, there are some definate advantages. One patient at a time (for the most part), and when the call is done, it is done. And getting paid by the hour whether it is slow or busy.

    My post wasn’t meant to make light of any other medical setting, it was just a reaction to a particularly unpleasant call with a vision of EMS heaven. (although after the respite of a few clean well-lit rooms, I would likely long for the real street).

    Peter C

  • Renee says:

    To work in the service of others, providing care whenever and wherever, in whatever situation, is our calling. While we deal with the nastiness, it is the occasional dream call that sustains us all.

    While I put most of the horror and less than fun calls into the back of my mind, it is the remembrance of the little girl hugging and clinging to me after we got her mother breathing again after an OD many years ago; the husband grabbing my hands and thanking me in some unknown language when we corrected his wife’s v-tach in the restaurant in south central L.A.; when I delivered the baby in the back of my rig; when I spoke with the wife of a man we had helo’d out with major head, neck, and chest trauma, who let me know her husband was speaking again after 3 weeks.

    Yeah, the dream of EMS heaven may be there… but I live for reality.

  • Medic188 says:

    That sounds very nice. As a medic-cum-ER doc, I’d still like that. The number of times I enter a room and find the patient undressed, in a gown, ready for an exam (unless they came from a nursing home) is basically zero during my average shift. As for the light, the soft white light I’d like is a working otoscope in each room.

  • To work in the service of others, providing care whenever and wherever, in whatever situation, is our calling. While we deal with the nastiness, it is the occasional dream call that sustains us all. While I put most of the horror and less than fun calls into the back of my mind, it is the remembrance of the little girl hugging and clinging to me after we got her mother breathing again after an OD many years ago; the husband grabbing my hands and thanking me in some unknown language when we corrected his wife’s v-tach in the restaurant in south central L.A.; when I delivered the baby in the back of my rig; when I spoke with the wife of a man we had helo’d out with major head, neck, and chest trauma, who let me know her husband was speaking again after 3 weeks. Yeah, the dream of EMS heaven may be there… but I live for reality.

  • That sounds very nice. As a medic-cum-ER doc, I’d still like that. The number of times I enter a room and find the patient undressed, in a gown, ready for an exam (unless they came from a nursing home) is basically zero during my average shift. As for the light, the soft white light I’d like is a working otoscope in each room.

  • Nona Mills says:

    Thanks for the comments, Joe, you are right. For all the drawbacks of prehospital, there are some definate advantages. One patient at a time (for the most part), and when the call is done, it is done. And getting paid by the hour whether it is slow or busy. My post wasn’t meant to make light of any other medical setting, it was just a reaction to a particularly unpleasant call with a vision of EMS heaven. (although after the respite of a few clean well-lit rooms, I would likely long for the real street). Peter C

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